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Instinctively Close Part 6 - The Cat Napper

Intro Text
Foreword by Dr Sam Taylor – vet and specialist in feline medicine

“People often ask me what drives their cats’ more curious behaviours.”

• Why do they sleep in such strange places?
• What are they trying to tell me when they meow so much?
• Why do they go missing, only to emerge hours later with a ‘present’ left ceremoniously on the doormat?

This report offers guidance on getting ‘instinctively closer’ to your pet – understanding why they do the things they do and why they’re not as far removed from their big cat cousins as we might think.
It also explores why wilder natural instincts can sometimes leave them vulnerable and how a little preventative care can help them roam the suburban jungle and the great indoors in safety.
Each section in this guide focuses on a different behaviour, alongside advice to help your family and your cat live together harmoniously.
Content
Image
sleepy cat taking a nap in a bed

‘Why does my cat sleep anywhere?’

Cats love to sleep – on average they rack up 15 hours of shut-eye a day. When choosing a sleeping spot, cats will seek out warmth and safety. While they can nap anywhere, they’re likely to choose one of a few favourite spots where attack isn’t possible when they need some quality sleep.

Enabling your cat to have routine and predictability in their life reduces stress and encourages calm. If your cat has abandoned their favourite cosy corner, it may be time to raise the flea infestation alarm.

Have you noticed your cat purposefully staying away from a place they used to love? This change of behaviour could indicate that the area has become a hotspot for fleas. If you notice this, it could be time to urgently review your pet’s flea treatment plan.

56% of owners say their cat changes their sleeping spot at least weekly – which could be a sign that their favourite spot has become infested with fleas.2

Did you know...
The Egyptian Mau is probably the oldest breed of cat. In fact, the breed is so ancient that its name is the Egyptian word for ‘cat’.3


2 Nationally representative survey of 2,000 British cat owners by 3gem research on behalf of Bayer
3 https://www.factretriever.com/cat-facts

https://icatcare.org/
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https://www.thespruce.com/how-cats-show-love-553978
http://www.catster.com/lifestyle/cat-behavior-cats-show-a ection-people-aloof-unemotional-myth
http://pets.webmd.com/cats/guide/cats-excessive-meowing#1
http://www.petsandparasites.org/dog-owners/roundworms/
http://www.purina.com.au/cats/behaviour/meow
https://www.drontalandadvantage.co.uk/